Saturday, 11 October 2014

THE LESSER ANTILLES and MARYLAND TRIP REPORT



THE LESSER ANTILLES 
6th DECEMBER, 2000 to 14th DECEMBER, 2000 
and
MARYLAND, U.S.A.
30th NOVEMBER, 2000 to 3rd DECEMBER, 2000 
and
15th to 17th DECEMBER, 2000.

J.F. & MRS.D.R.COOPER 
B.E.COOPER & G. B.MACKIERNAN.


John & Doreen would like to thank Barry & Gail for kindly accommodating us at their home whilst we were in Maryland and also for arranging flights etc to the Lesser Antilles.



ITINERARY - LESSER ANTILLES

6th December, 2000 All Day St.Lucia visiting various sites in the South & North. Early morning Quilesse Forest Reserve trail, and then drove a short distance to the Fox Grove Inn and walked a short trail directly over a yellow road bridge and the trial started directly behind the large Inn road sign by the side of the road just over the bridge. We then drove North to the Chaubourg Forest Reserve and late afternoon walked the forest trail at the Forestry H.Q. near Castries.  Overnight Rainbow Hotel, Gros Inlet.


Looking across the Gros Inlet, St. Lucia


Orchid on St. Lucia

7th December, 2000 Most of the day spent on the trails at the Edmond Forest Reserve including time spent at the Parrot lookout and then again visited and walked the Fox Grove Inn trail.  We then drove South around Vieux Fort, looking for a wet land habitat but were unable to locate this before driving North along the Western coast road stopping at a small Forest Reserve. Overnight Rainbow Hotel, Gros Inlet.



The Pintons, St. Lucia

8th December 2000 Early morning flight to St.Vincent and walked the Vermont Forest Reserve trail spending time at the Parrot lookout. Afternoon visit to the Kingstown Botanical Garden. Overnight Heron Hotel, Kingstown.


View from the Parrot Lookout, St. Vincent

9th December 2000 Early morning Vermont Forest Reserve trail and parrot lookout. Afternoon visit to Brighton Beach Mangroves.


General View on St. Vincent


Tree Snail on St. Vincent

10th December 2000 Spent most of the day flying to Dominica via Barbados and St. Lucia. Late afternoon birding around the Springfield Plantation Guest House near Roseau. Overnight at the Guest House.


Springfield Guest House, Dominica


View from Springfield Guest House

11th December, 2000 Early morning Syndicate Trail & Estate including the parrot lookout at Morne Diablotin, then spent time birding around the Springfield Plantation Guest House with a late afternoon visit to the Emerald Pool. Overnight at the Guest House.



Views on Dominica

12th December, 2000 Pre-dawn visit to the Emerald Pool walking the forest trails, birding around the Springfield Plantation Guest House, Portsmouth Marsh, and then parrot lookout along the Syndicate Trail. Overnight Guest House.


View over Portsmouth Harbour, Dominca.


Orchid on Dominica


Butterfly on Dominica

13th December, 2000 Pre-dawn visit to Emerald Pool walking forest trail, birding around the Springfield Plantation Guest House and then visit to Canefield near Roseau before flying to St. Lucia. Overnight Rainbow Hotel, Gros Inlet.


14th December, 2000 Early morning birding at Gros Inlet before drive to Hewanorra Airport for flight back to Washington D.C.
SYSTEMATIC LIST


Brown Booby – Sula leucogaster
An immature bird flew past us out to sea on the 13th near Canefield, Dominica.

Magnificent Frigatebird – Fregata magnificens
Four seen on the 9th at Brighton Beach, St. Vincent, with 6 on the 12th near Portsmouth and 2 on the 13th at Canefield, Dominica.

Herring Gull – Larus argentus
A second year bird was sat on a buoy with some Royal Terns on the 13th at Canefield, Dominica. Is considered a vagrant in the Lesser Antilles.

Royal Tern – Sterna maxima
Recorded on Dominica with 10 on the 12th and 8 on the 13th and at Gros Inlet, St. Lucia with 15 on the 14th.








Royal Terns at the Gros Inlet, St. Lucia.

Little Blue Heron – Egretta caerulea
Seen on St.Vincent with one on the 8th and 5 on the 9th with one on the 11th on Dominica

Cattle Egret – Bubulcus ibis
Recorded on both St. Lucia and St. Vincent on five dates with a maximum of 40 on the 9th.

Snowy Egret – Egretta thula
Ten seen on the 7th near Vieux Fort, St. Lucia.

Great Blue Heron – Ardea herodias
Just a single bird seen on the 13th on Dominica. Considered uncommon in the Lesser Antilles.

Great Egret – Ardea alba
Just two seen on the 7th on St. Lucia.

Yellow Crowned Night Heron – Nyctanassa violacea
Good views of an adult in the mangroves at Brighton Beach, St. Vincent on the 9th and another adult in the marsh at Portsmouth, Dominica on the 12th.

Green Heron – Butorides virescens
Odd birds recorded daily on Dominica.



Little Green Heron on Dominica

Spotted Sandpiper – Actitis macularia
Odd birds recorded on three dates on St. Vincent and Dominica.

American Kestrel – Falco sparverius
Recorded on all three islands on five dates with a maximum of four on the 8th.

Common Black Hawk – Buteogallus anthracinus
Only recorded on St. Vincent in the Vermont Forest Reserve with 6 on the 8th and 2 on the 9th.


Common Black Hawk over the Vermont Forest Reserve,
St. Vincent

Broad Winged Hawk – Buteo platypterus
The commonest raptor and seen on all three islands with a daily maximum of 8 on the 8th and 10 on the 11th.




Broad-winged Hawk on Dominica

Scaly-naped Pigeon – Columba squamosa
No where near as common as expected and only seen on St. Vincent with 6 in the Botanical Gardens feeding on the date palms on the 8th and 2 seen in the Vermont Forest Reserve on the 9th.

Eurasian Collared Dove – Streptopelia decaocto
Ten seen near Canefield Airport, Dominica on the 13th.

Zenaida Dove – Zenaida aurita
We only saw this dove near urban areas and was not seen at all on St. Vincent but here we spent most of our time in the rain-forests. Recorded on both St. Lucia and Dominica with a daily maximum of 8 on the 14th. It proved to be quite an attractive dove.



Zenaida Dove on St. Lucia

Common Ground Dove – Columbia passerina
Recorded on all three islands in low numbers and was chiefly seen when flushed from the roadside.

St. Lucia Parrot – Amazona versicolor
A single bird seen briefly flying across a clearing with others heard calling on the 6th from the Quillesse Forest Trail and 10 seen well on the 7th from the parrot lookout in the Edmond Forest Reserve. Considered vulnerable by Collar.

St. Vincent Parrot – Amazona guildingii
Fifteen seen on the 8th and 20 on the 9th in the Vermont Forest Reserve. Excellent views of both colour phases both in flight and feeding in the trees and proved to be one of the highlights of the trip. Considered by Collar as vulnerable.

Imperial Parrot – Amazona imperialis
Two seen on the 11th and 3 on the 12th but only in flight from the parrot lookout along the Syndicate Trail Dominica. The largest amazon and one of the rarest with probably only 80 birds left in the wild and considered vulnerable by Collar.

Red Necked Parrot – Amazona arausiaca
Excellent views obtained on the Syndicate Estate, Dominica, feeding on banana flowers with 30 on the 11th, 10 on the 12th and 2 near the Emerald Pool on the 13th.  Considered vulnerable by Collar.

Mangrove Cuckoo – Coccyzus minor
Recorded on five dates on all three islands but never more than 2 on a day, superb views obtained.




Mangrove Cuckoo of the rufous colour phase on Dominica.

Smooth Billed Ani – Crotophaga ani 
Recorded in scrub areas along the coast on St. Vincent and Dominica with a daily maximum of 15 on the 12th.


Smooth Billed Ani on Dominica
House Wren – Troglodytes aedon
I have still treated this as one species but some authorities consider the Island forms to be separate species. One seen on St  Lucia in the Chaubourg  Forest Reserve on the 6th. Was a large pale breasted and pale face bird with a long decurved bill with yellow lower bill and distinctive song. One seen on the 9th in the Vermont Forest Reserve St. Vincent appeared a lot darker with a shorter bill. Two seen on the 11th along the Syndicate Trail on Dominica and one flew across the road on the 13th near the Emerald Pool were also dark.  The St. Lucia bird has become very rare and is considered threatened.




St. Lucia's House Wren in the Chaubourg Forest Reserve, St. Lucia.
We were very fortunate to have such good views of this scarce endemic
and it would appear to be a good split species from House Wren

Black Swift – Cypseloides niger
Just two seen briefly on the 8th from the parrot lookout in Vermont Forest Reserve, St. Vincent.

Lesser Antillean Swift – Chaetura martinica
70 seen on the 7th feeding over a village near the Edmond Forest Reserve, St. Lucia and small numbers seen at several sites on Dominica.

Antillean Crested Hummingbird – Orthorhyncus cristatus
This delightful hummingbird was seen in reasonable numbers virtually daily on all three islands in various habitats. Daily maximum of 15 on the 7th. When the sun caught the crest this was stunning.



Poor record shot of an Antillean Crested Hummingbird.

Purple Throated Carib – Eulampis jugularis
Recorded on five dates on all three islands and chiefly seen in the higher rain-forests. Maximum daily count was 12 on the 7th. Another fine species.


Purple-throated Carib on St. Lucia



Purple-throated Carib on Dominica

Green Throated Carib – Eulampis holosericeus
Just six birds seen on five dates on all three islands. It appeared to be more of a lowland species.

Blue Headed Hummingbird – Cyanophaia bicolor
Four seen on the 11th on the Syndicate Estate and one on the 13th at the Springfield Plantation Guest House, Dominica. Probably the best of the hummers.







Blue-headed Hummingbird on Dominica.
Belted Kingfisher – Ceryle alcyon

Just three birds seen on Dominica



Grenada Flycatcher – Myiarchus nugator
Only seen on St. Vincent with 2 on the 8th in the Botanical Gardens and 2 also on the 9th.







Granada Flycatcher in the Botanical Gardens on Dominica.


Lesser Antillean Flycatcher – Myiarchus oberi
Two seen on the 6th and four on the 7th on St. Lucia, with one on the 11th and 3 on the 12th on Dominica

Gray Kingbird – Tyrannus dominicensis
Good numbers seen daily around the coasts etc on all three islands.







Grey Kingbird on Dominica
Caribbean Elaenia – Elaenia martinica
Just three singles seen on three dates and on all three islands.

Yellow Bellied Elaenia – Elaenia flavogaster
Just a single bird seen on the 9th on the track that leads down to Brighton Beach, St. Vincent.

Lesser Antillean Pewee – Contopus latirostris
Two seen on the 11th and one on the 12th at the start of the Syndicate Trail, Dominica.




Lesser Antillean Pewee at the start of the Syndicate Trail, Dominica.

St. Lucia Pewee – Contopus oberi
Six seen along the Quilesse Forest Reserve trail, St. Lucia in the early morning of the 6th and these prove to be our only sightings. They were a rusty red on the underparts with dark upperparts and a very broad base bill and looked a lot different to the much paler Lesser Antillean Pewee.

Barn Swallow – Hirundo rustica
Three seen on the 12th and five on the 13th around the coast on Dominica.

Rufous Throated Solitaire – Myadestes genibarbis
One seen very well along the Quilesse Forest Reserve trail and one along the Forest H.Q. trail on St. Lucia on the 6th with excellent views of one singing in the open on the 7th along the Edmond Forest Reserve trail, St. Lucia and four on the 11th around the Emerald Pool trail, Dominica. This proved to be Doreen's favourite species of the trip.




Rufous Throated Solitaire on St. Lucia

Brown Trembler – Cinclocerthia ruficauda
Not seen on St. Lucia. Two seen on the 8th and 3 on the 9th along the Vermont Forest Trail, St Vincent. They were a lot commoner on Dominica around the Springfield Plantation Guest House and the Emerald Pool and reasonable numbers seen on all four days with a maximum of 20 on the 12th.


 



 


Brown Tremblers at the Emerald Pool, Dominica


Brown Trembler-Trembling at the Emerald Pool, Dominica.
(This picture was published in Handbook of the Birds of the World,)

Gray Trembler – Cinclocerthia gutturalis
Two seen on the 6th at the Quilesse Forest Reserve and Forest H.Q. trail, St. Lucia and one on the 7th at the Edmond Forest Reserve, St. Lucia.

White Breasted Thrasher – Ramphocinclus brachyurus
One re-acted to tape play and showed very well in the dry forest along the Fox Grove Inn Trail, St. Lucia on the 6th.  Its behaviour and appearance was much more of a trembler than a thrasher.  There are probably less than 100 pairs in the World and it is restricted to a few areas on St. Lucia and Martinique and is considered endangered by Collar.

Scaly Breasted Thrasher – Margarops fuscus
Surprisingly, we only saw this species on Dominica where it was reasonably common around the Springfield Plantation Guest House and we also saw it in the coastal scrub.  Daily maximum of 6 on the 11th.  It may be that it is not a bird of the true rain-forests where we spent most of our time.





Scaly-breasted Thrasher at the Springfield Plantation Guest House, Dominica.

Pearly Eyed Thrasher – Margarops fuscatus
Just a single bird seen, which came in to tape play along the Fox Grove Inn Trail on the 6th.

Tropical Mockingbird – Mimus gilvus
Small numbers seen out of rain-forest habitat on all three islands on six dates.


Tropical Mockingbird on St. Lucia
Forest Thrush – Cichlherminia Iherminieri
After visiting the Emerald Pool, Dominica during the late afternoon on the 11th and not connecting with this species even after tape play back, we decided to visit pre-dawn on the 12th and as we were walking along the forest track in the dark a Forest Thrush came hopping out like a “Pitta” onto the path a few yards from us. During the early morning we saw 3 on the 12th and 3 on the 13th and in total was probably five different birds over the two days.  The highlight of the trip.




 



 


Forest Thrush at the Emerald Pool, Dominica.

Cocoa Thrush – Turdus fumigatus
Just three seen on the 9th in the Vermont Forest Reserve, St. Vincent.

Bare Eyed Thrush – Turdus nudigenis
Only seen on St. Vincent with 10 in the Botanical Gardens on the 8th and six seen on the 9th at several sites. 



Bare Eyed Thrush in the Botanical Gardens on St. Vincent.

Red Legged Thrush – Turdus plumbeus
One responded to tape play back and showed briefly but well on the Syndicate Estate, Dominica on the 11th.

Black Whiskered Vireo – Vireo altiloquus
Two seen on the 8th & 9th in the Vermont Forest Reserve, St. Vincent and two seen on the 11th along the Syndicate Trail, Dominica.

Northern Waterthrush – Seiurus noveboracensis
Two found along the edge of Portsmouth Marsh, Dominica on the 12th.

Yellow Warbler – Dendroica petechia
A pair and the male had a good red crown were found in the grounds of the Springfield Plantation Guest House, Dominica on the 11th and three were seen in bushes along the edge of Portsmouth Marsh, Dominica on the 12th. Again one male had a good red crown.

St. Lucia’s Warbler – Dendroica delicata
This recently split warbler, formerly lumped with Adelaide’s Warbler, was seen on the 6th, with 6 seen along the Quilesse Forest Reserve Trail and 2 seen along the Fox Grove Inn Trail, St. Lucia with one on the 7th in the Forest Reserve along the West Coast, St. Lucia.



St. Lucia's Warbler in the Forest Reserve on St. Lucia.
American Redstart – Setophaga ruticilla
A lstY. Bird was found in the bushes by Portsmouth marsh, Dominica on the 12th.

Whistling Warbler – Catharopeza bishopi
Only seen in the Vermont Forest Reserve, St. Vincent with 2 on the 8th and 6 on the 9th. A stunning warbler and re-acted very well to tape play back with birds coming right over our heads. One of the highlights of the trip.

Plumbeous Warbler – Dendroica plumbea
This very grey warbler was seen at a couple of sites on Dominica giving excellent views with 2 on the 11th and 3 on the 12th. It wasn’t restricted to the rain-forests and one showed well in the Springfield Plantation Guest House Grounds.


Plumbeous Warbler on Dominica
Antillean Euphonia – Euphonia musica
Just a single bird seen feeding in mistletoe on the Syndicate Estate, Dominica on the 11th. It had a lovely blue crown and nape with a yellow patch above the bill and totally green underparts.

Bananaquit – Coereba flaveola
Common and widespread on all the islands with upto 50+ seen daily. Several colour phases were seen some with white throats others with blackish throats and on St. Vincent in the rainforests there is an all black race with a reddish gape and good numbers of these were seen at the Vermont Forest Reserve with the usual race being seen around the coast.



Banaquit on Dominica

Lesser Antillean Tanager – Tangara cucullata
Three of these attractive Tanagers were found feeding in a fruiting tree from the parrot lookout, Vermont Forest Reserve, St. Vincent on the 8th.

St. Lucia Oriole – Icterus laudabilis
A male gave good views along the Quilesse Forest Reserve, St Lucia and a female type along the Fox Grove Inn Trail on the 6th and a pair seen on the 7th at the Edmond Forest Reserve, St. Lucia.

Carib Grackle – Quiscalus lugubris
Seen on all three Islands, common on St. Lucia but only seen in Kingstown, on St. Vincent and only a total of 6 seen on Dominica.



Carib Grackle on St. Lucia
Black Faced Grassquit – Tiaris bicolor
Reasonable numbers seen on all three Islands with a daily maximum of 30 on the 9th.

Lesser Antillean Saltator – Saltator albicollis
Not recorded on St. Vincent. One seen on the 7th along the Fox Grove Inn Trail, St. Lucia, Four seen on the 11th and 2 on the 12th on Dominica. Very good views were had in the Springfield Plantation Guest House.


Lesser Antillean Saltator on Dominica.

St. Lucia Black Finch – Melanospiza richardsoni
Just two females seen, the first on the 6th along the Quilesse Forest Reserve Trail and the second on the 7th along the Grove Fox Inn Trail. Although similar to the Bullfinch, they have a much heavier bill, a larger more stocky bird and bright pink legs. They are a more sluggish bird compared with the Bullfinch and often feed close to or on the ground.

Lesser Antillean Bullfinch – Loxigilla noctis
Very common in all types of habitat on all three Islands with upto 100 being seen on a day.


Male Lesser Antillean Bullfinch on Dominica


Female Lesser Antillean Bullfinch on Dominica

ITINERARY-WASHINGTON, USA.




30th November, 2000 Silver Spring, Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary,  Patuxent River, Layhill Park.


1st December, 2000  Silver Spring, Black Hills Regional Park & Reservoir, Hughes Hollow, Layhill 

                                  Park.
2nd December, 2000 West Ocean City Pond, Ocean City Inlet, Ocean Pines, India River, Silver Lake
                                  Cape Henlopen.

3rd December, 2000  Silver Springs, Frederick County Lilly Ponds & Surrounding Fields.



15th December,2000 Silver Springs Wood, New Design Road Fields.



16th December,2000  Layhill Park  (Christmas Count).



17th December,2000  Black Hills Regional Park & Reservoir,  Hughes Hollow.



SYSTEMATIC LIST

Red Throated Diver - Gavia stellata
Four seen at Cape Henlopen on the 2nd.

Great Northern Diver - Gavia immer
Two seen at Cape Henlopen on the 2nd.

Slavonian Grebe -  Podiceps autitus
Six seen on the 2nd at Cape Henlopen. 

Pied Billed Grebe – Podilymbus podiceps
Eight seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, with one here on the 17th.

Great Cormorant – Phalacrocorax carbo
Our only sighting was of a single bird on the 2nd at Ocean City Inlet.

Double Crested Cormorant – Phalacrocorax auritus
Four seen at Ocean City on the 2nd.

Northern Gannet – Morus bassanus
Two seen at Cape Henlopen on the 2nd.

Great Blue Herons – Ardea herodias
2 seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 1 seen at Black Hill Reservoir on the 1st, 12 were seen at various sites on the 2nd, three were present at the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.



Great Blue Heron at Ocean City

Black Crowned Night Heron – Nycticorax nycticorax
12 seen roosting at Ocean City Pond on the 12th

Tundra Swan – Cygnus columbianus
Three seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 20 were seen flying over on the 2nd, two flew over the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

Canada Goose – Branta canadensis
Large numbers seen daily, all were of the large nominate race.

Snow Goose – 10,000 were seen along the India River on the 2nd, a fine sight.




Snow Geese along the India River.
Mallard -Anas platyrhnchos
Recorded on several dates but only in small numbers.

Black Duck – Anas rubripes
70 seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 70 were seen on the 2nd at Silver Lake,





Black Duck at Jug Bay.
Gadwall - Anas strepera
10 seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 8 seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, few seen on the 2nd,

Pintail – Anas strepera
Six seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 3 seen on the 2nd at Ocean City Pond,

American Wigeon – Anas americana
A pair were seen at Silver Lake on the 2nd. 

Shoveler – Anas clypeata
Four seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, several seen at Silver Lake on the 2nd,

Green Winged Teal – Anas crecca
Two were seen at Jug Bag on the 30th.

Canvasback – Aythya valisineria
Five were seen at Black Hill Reservoir on the 1st, upto 200 seen on the 2nd at various lakes, and 50 on the 17th at Black Hills Reservoir.

Redhead – Anthya americana
A pair seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, and another pair seen at Silver Lake on the 2nd, with one at Black Hills Reservoir on the 17th.

Tufted Duck – Aythya fuligula
A female seen near Silver Lake on the 2nd.

Ring Necked Duck – Anthya collaris
Four seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 6 seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, and 6 seen on the 2nd at Ocean City Pond, with fifty at Black Hills Reservoir on the 17th.

Greater Scaup – Aythya marila
10 seen at Silver Lake on the 2nd.

Lesser Scaup – Aythya affinis
15 seen on the 2nd at Ocean City Pond, and 25 at Black Hills Reservoir on the 17th.

Harlequin Duck – Histrionicus histrionicus
A surprise find was a female seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the lst and again on the 17th, it gave very close views and was approx. 200 miles inland. It was the first County record and the first for the Piedmount area. A fine drake was found at Ocean City Inlet on the 2nd.






Female Harlequin Duck on Black Hills Reservoir

Long Tailed Duck – Clangula hyemalis
Two were found with the drake Harlequin at Ocean City Inlet on the 2nd.

Surf Scoter – Melanitta perspicllata
A female was seen at Cape Henlopen on the 2nd.

Bufflehead – Bucephala albeola
Thirty seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, 40 seen on the 2nd around Ocean City, three showed very well on the Lily Ponds on the 3rd. Fifty were seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 17th.




 

Buffleheads at the Lily Ponds

Hooded Merganser – Lophodytes cucullatus
25 seen at Jug Bay on the 30th including several fine drakes displaying, 4 seen at the Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, 10 were seen on the 2nd around Ocean City,

Red Breasted Merganser – Mergus serrator
Thirty were seen at Cape Henlopen on the 2nd.

Ruddy Duck – Oxyura jamaicensis
Two seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 25 seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, 300 were seen on the 2nd around Ocean City.  Twenty were present on Black Hills Reservoir on the 17th.

Turkey Vulture – Cathartes aura
Common and widespread and seen daily.

Black Vulture – Ckoragyps atratus
Six seen in the Jug Bay area and 2 at Layhill Park on the 30th, Four were seen on the journey to Ocean City on the 2nd, and one in Black Hills Regional Park on the 17th.

Northern Harrier – Circus cyaneus
Two seen at Jug Bay on the 30th. One was seen on the 2nd at Cape Henlopen.

Sharp Shinned Hawk – Accipiter striatus
One seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, with one at the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

Cooper’s Hawk – Accipiter cooperii
One seen at Silver Spring and one at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st.

Red Shouldered Hawk – Buteo lineatus
One seen at Hughes Hollow on the 1st. with one near the Lily Ponds on the 3rd. One was seen in Silver Spring Wood on the 15th.  One seen in Layhill Park on the 16th.  One seen in Black Hills Regional Park on the 17th.

Red Tailed Hawk – Buteo jamaicensis
Small numbers seen virtually daily.

Bald Eagle – Haliaeetus leucocephalus
An adult and immature seen very well at Jug Bay on the 30th, Four were seen on the 2nd around Ocean City, with fine views of an adult over Black Hills Reservoir on the 17th.





Adult Bald Eagle over Ocean City.

Merlin – Falco columbarius
One seen very well on the 1st at Hughes Hollow.

American Kestrel – Falco sparverius
Small numbers seen at several sites throughout our stay.

Peregrine – Falco peregrinus
One seen at Jug Bay on the 30th.

American Coot – Fulica americana
Fifty seen at Black Hills Reservoir on the 1st, and others seen at other sites during our trip.

Killdeer – Charadrius vociferus
Four were found feeding in the fields near the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

American Oystercatcher – Haematopus  palliatus
Forty were seen at Ocean City Inlet on the 2nd.

Greater Yellowlegs – Tringa melanoleuca
Twelve were found feeding on Ocean City Pond on the 2nd.

Ruddy Turnstone – Arenaria interpres
Thirty were seen at Ocean City Inlet on the 2nd.

Purple Sandpiper – Calidris maritima
Eight seen at Ocean City Inlet on the 2nd.




 

Purple Sandpiper at Ocean City.

Sanderling – Calidris alba
Eighty seen at Cape Henlopen on the 2nd.

American Snipe – Gallinago gallinago
One flushed at the Lily Ponds on the 3rd. 

Bonaparte’s Gull – Larus philadelphia
Thirty of these delightful gulls seen on the India River on the 2nd and excellent views obtained.



 


 


 

Adult winter plumage Bonapartes Gull along the India River.
Laughing Gull – Larus atricilla
Two seen at Jug Bay on the 30th.

Ring Billed Gull – Larus delawarensis
The common gull with good numbers seen on several dates.



Herring Gull – Larus argentatus
Good numbers seen on several dates, good views of juveniles seen at the coast where they appeared much more uniform brown than the “British” birds with dark brown upper tail coverts and rump, very distinctive. 





Juvenile American Herring Gulls at Ocean City.


2nd or 3rdW type Herring Gull at Ocean City

                          
Adult winter plumage American Herring Gull at Ocean City.

Lesser Black Backed Gull – Larus fuscus
An adult seen at Jug Bay on the 30th.

Greater Black Back Gull – Larus marinus
Small numbers seen at several sites.

Forster’s Tern – Sterna forsteri
Twenty were found along the India River on the 2nd.

Mourning Dove – Zeniada macroura
Seen in small numbers at most locations.

Barn Owl – Tyto alba
A pair present in a barn at Jug Bay on the 30th, the female was large and noticeably darker breasted than the male.

Snowy Owl – Nyctea scandiaca 
Stunning close views were obtained of a 1stW. bird feeding on a dead rat in a field and then perched on a telegraph pole along New Design Road, near the Lily Ponds on the 15th.






 






1stW. Snowy Owl along New Design Road near the Lily Ponds.

Barred Owl – Strix varia
One flushed and seen very well in flight at Hughes Hollow on the 1st.

Rufous Hummingbird – Selasphorus rufus
Good views obtained of a winter plumage bird coming to a feeder at Ocean Pines on the 2nd.

Belted Kingfisher – Ceryle alcyon
One seen at Layhill Park on the 30th,one seen on the 2nd at Silver Lake,

Red Headed Woodpecker – Melanerpes erythrocephalus
One performed very well for us at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st.

Red Bellied Woodpecker – Melanerpes carolinus
Small numbers seen daily in wooded areas including gardens.

Yellow Bellied Sapsucker – Sphyrapicus varius
Excellent views of an adult male feeding at Hughes Hollow on the 17th.




Adult male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker at Hughes Hollow.

Downy Woodpecker – Picoides pubescens
Small numbers seen daily.




Downy Woodpecker at Silver Springs.

Northern Flicker – Colaptes autatus
One seen at Layhill Park on the 30th, 2 seen at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st, one at the Lily Ponds on the 3rd. Two seen in Silver Spring Wood on the 15th,

Eastern Phoebe – Sayornis phoebe
Two found wintering at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, with one at the Lily Ponds on the 3rd, and one at Hughes Hollow on the 17th.

Blue Jay – Cyanocitta cristata
One seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 1 seen at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st, three seen near the Lily Ponds on the 3rd with one in Layhill Park on the 16th.

American Crow – Corvus brachyrhynchos
Very common and widespread.

Fish Crow – Corvus ossifragus
One seen and heard at Jug Bay on the 30th.

Horned Lark – Eremophila alpestris
Fifty found feeding in the fields by the Lily Ponds on the 3rd, with 2 seen along New Design Road on the 15th.

Tufted Titmouse – Baeolaphus bicolor
Common in several wooded areas ie Silver Springs and seen daily.

Carolina Chickadee – Poecile carolinensis
Reasonable numbers seen daily at various wooded locations including gardens.

White Breasted Nuthatch – Sitta carolinensis
Two seen at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st and small numbers seen at several sites on other dates.

Brown Creeper – Certhia americana
One found in Silver Spring Wood on the 15th, with one at Hughes Hollow on the 17th.

Carolina Wren – Thryothorus ludovicianus
One seen at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, three seen in Silver Spring wood on the 15th.

Winter Wren – Troglodytes troglodytes
One seen at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, with one at Hughes Hollow on the 17th.

Golden Crowned Kinglet – Regulus satrapa 
Four seen at Jug Bay woods and one at Layhill Park on the 30th, Eight seen in Silver Spring Wood on the 15th, with 10 in Layhill Park on the 16th.




Record shot of a Golden Crowned Kinglet in Silver Spring Wood.

Ruby Crowned Kinglet – Regulus calendula
Nice views obtained of a single bird at Hughes Hollow on the 17th.

Eastern Bluebird – Sialia sialis
Six seen at Jug Bay and 2 at Layhill Park on the 30th, with 15 at Layhill Park on the 1st, Four seen at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, with 2 in Layhill Park on the 16th.




 
 Eastern Bluebird at Layhill Park

American Robin – Turdus migratorius
Two were seen at Jug Bay on the 30th.

Hermit Thrush – Catharus guttatus
One was seen briefly in Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st.

Northern Mockingbird – Mimus polyglottos
Reasonable numbers seen daily at various sites.

Brown Thrasher – Toxostoma rufum
One showed well at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st.

European Starling – Sturnus vulgaris
Common and widespread.

Cedar Waxwing – Bombycilla cedrorum
Eight settled briefly in trees in Layhill Park on the 16th, and fifty flew over Hughes Hollow on the 17th.

Yellow Rumped Warbler – Dendroica coronata
One seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, one at Black Hills Regional Park on the 1st.  Six seen at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, one in Silver Spring Wood on the 15th, and a flock of 12 at Hughes Hollow on the 17th. 

Palm Warbler – Dendroica palmarum
Good views obtained of one at Ocean Pines on the 2nd.



Palm Warbler at Ocean Pines.
Pine Warbler – Dendroica pinus
A fine adult gave excellent views at Ocean Pines on the 2nd.





Pine Watbler at Ocean Pines

Northern Cardinal – Cardinalis cardinalis
Common in gardens and woodlands and large numbers seen in Layhill Park, and Black Hills Regional Park. Fifty were seen in Layhill Park on the 16th.

Eastern Towhee – Pipilo erythrophthalmus
One seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, with 4 seen at Layhill Park on the 16th.

American Tree Sparrow – Spizella arborea
Eight showed very well in a grassy area and also at the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

Field Sparrow – Spizella pusilla
20 seen at Layhill Park on the 30th, with 8 on the 1st, 4 seen at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, and 4 seen at Layhill Park on the 16th.




 



Field Sparrows at Ocean City


Chipping Sparrow – Spizella passerina
Two seen at Layhill Park on the 1st, with six at Ocean Pines on the 2nd, with 4 seen at Layhill Park on the 16th. 



 


Chipping Sparrows at Layhill Park


Nelson’s Sharp Tailed Sparrow – Aammodramus nelsoni
Four of these attractive sparrows, one of which sat up well in the marshy area near India River were seen on the 2nd.

Saltmarsh Sharp Tailed Sparrow – Ammodramus caudacutus
At least one showed very well in the marsh near India River on the 2nd and good comparision could be made with the previous species.

Savannah Sparrow – Passerculus sandwichensis
Two were found in coastal scrub by the marsh near India River on the 2nd.

White Throated Sparrow – Zonotrichia albicollis
25 seen at Jug Bay on the 30th and 25 at Layhill Park also on the 30th, 25 seen at Layhill Park on the 1st, 8 were seen around the Lily Ponds on the 3rd. A good count of 50 at Layhill Park on the 16th.



Summer plumage White-throated Sparrow at Layhill Park.

White Crowned Sparrow – Zonotrichia leucophrys
A flock of 20 were found feeding in a hedgerow in the fields near the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

Fox Sparrow – Passerella iliaca
Good views obtained of  eight of the Eastern Red race at Layhill Park on the 1st, and at least 20 showed very well on the 16th at Layhill Park.







Fox Sparrow of the Eastern race at Layhill Park

Song Sparrow – Melospiza melodia
15 seen at Layhill Park on the 30th, with 25 seen on the 1st at Layhill and Black Hills, with  large numbers at various sites throughout our trip. At least 40 were seen at Layhill Park on the 16th.

Swamp Sparrow – Melospiza georgiana
Twelve were seen around the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

Dark Eyed Junco – Junco hyemalis
Seen daily with good numbers at Layhill Park, including 25 on the 16th.



Dark-eyed Junco at Layhill Park
                                     
Lapland Bunting – Calcarius  lapponicus
One found feeding with the Horned Larks in the fields near the Lily Ponds on the 3rd.

Eastern Meadowlark – Sturnella magna
Ten showed well in the fields near the Lily Ponds on the 3rd, most appeared to be in breeding plumage.

Red Winged Blackbird – Agelaius phoeniceus
Ten were seen at Jug Bay on the 30th, 2 seen on the 1st, and 20 at Layhill Park on the 16th.

Rusty Blackbird – Euphagus cyanocephalus
Good views were obtained of a flock of 20 feeding low to the ground in a flooded wooded swamp at Jug Bay on the 30th.

Boat Tailed Grackle – Quiscalus major
Twelve were found along the sea-wall by the India River on the 2nd. 




Female and male Boat-tailed Grackles along the sea-wall by the India River.

Purple Finch – Carpodacus purpureus
A female showed well briefly on top of a tree at Hughes Hollow on the 17th.

House Finch – Carpodacus mexicanus
Two seen on the 1st at Layhill Park, two were seen at Ocean Pines on the 2nd. Six were seen at Layhill Park on the 16th.

American Goldfinch – Carduelis tristis
Seen virtually daily at various sites in low numbers, maximum count was 25 at Layhill Park on the 16th.

House Sparrow – Passer domesticus
Seen daily in built up areas.


No comments:

Post a Comment