Monday, 20 October 2014

HONG KONG 7th April, 1994 to 15th April, 1994.


HONG KONG

7TH APRIL TO 15TH APRIL, 1994

JOHN & DOREEN COOPER


ITINERARY

7th April, 1994     Mai Po Marshes


Downtown Hong Kong in 1994 when it was still a British colony.




Hong Kong Harbour views taken in 1994

8th April, 1994     Mai Po Marshes (am)  & Lok Ma Chau (pm)


Map of Mai Po Marshes Nature Reserve.



Views of Mai Po Marshes near the bird ringing site.


Mist-net bird ringing site at Mai Po.


Boardwalk leading out to the floating hide overlooking the tidal mud flats.


Looking from the floating hide into Deep Bay and across to mainland China.


9th April, 1994     Mai Po Marshes (early am), then ferry trip to Ping Chau Island.


Looking out from one of the bird hides over apool at Mai Po Nature Reserve.


Arriving at Ping Chau Island.

10th April, 1994   Tsim Bei Tsui (The Fence am) & Kam Tin (pm)


Doreen and Liz walking the fence towards the boardwalk.

11th April, 1994   Mai Po Marshes with evening visit to Chau Tau.



Waders and Gulls from the floating hide in Deep Bay at high tide.

12th April, 1994   Tai Po Kau (am) & Mai Po Marshes (pm)

13th April, 1994   Mai Po Marshes

14th April, 1994   Mai Po Marshes

15th April, 1994   Mai Po Marshes (early am), Kowloon Park before the return flight to
    London.


Kowloon Park


We went with a small group of birders arranged by Wildwings and led by David Rosliar and included Roger & Liz Charlwood and Dick Filby.
We stayed for the full time at the Peter Scott Lodge at Mai Po Marshes and our visit coincided with the Spring hightides.

SYSTEMATIC LIST

Little Grebe – Tachbaptus ruficollis poggei
Upto 20 seen daily at Mai Po.

Great Cormorant – Phalacrocorax carbo
Small numbers seen daily at Mai Po, with a daily maximum of 20 on the 7th.

Grey Heron – Ardea cinerea
Good numbers seen daily, chiefly at Mai Po with up to 50 on a day chiefly roosting in front of the tower hide.

Purple Heron – Ardea purpurea
Small numbers recorded on 4 dates with a maximum of 3 on a day chiefly seen from the tower hide.

Chinese Pond Heron – Ardeola bacchus
Common, upto 60 seen daily, many in full breeding plumage.





Various Chinese Pond Herons at Mai Po.
Cattle Egret – Bubulcus ibis
Only small numbers seen on four dates, with a daily maximum of 5 on the 8th. We were informed that up to 100 were present on the nearby rubbish dump.

Great White Egret – Egretta alba
Up to 50 seen daily at Mai Po.

Intermediate Egret – Egretta intermedia
Seen on four dates but only at Mai Po with a daily maximum of 5 on the 13th.

Little Egret – Egretta garzetta
Very common, with up to 250 seen daily.

Black Crowned Night Heron – Nycticorax nycticorax
Very common at Mai Po, and also seen at other sites including in Kowoon Park. Up to 500 on a day could be seen.

Yellow Bittern – Ixobrychus sinensis
Singles seen at Mai Po on the 8th, 12th and 13th on a reedy pool close to the lodge.

Cinnamon Bittern – Ixobrychus cinnamomeus
Two seen on the 8th with singles seen on the 13th and 14th on the same pool as the Yellow Bittern. Superb flight views were obtained on the 14th.

Great Bittern – Botaurus stellaris
A single bird gave very close views both on the ground and in flight, at Mai Po on the 13th and 14th.

Black Headed Ibis – Threstiornis melanocephalus
Singles seen at Mai Po on the 13th, 14th and 15th probably related to 2 different birds.

 
A distant Black-headed Ibis at Mai Po.

European Spoonbill – Platalea leucorodia
A single bird seen on the 7th, 12th and 15th at Mai Po, usually associating with the Black Faced Spoonbills.

Black Faced Spoonbill – Platalea minor
A superb flock of up to 33 birds, were seen virtually daily at Mai Po.




Black-faced Spoonbills at Mai Po.
Common Teal – Anas crecca
A flock of 70 on the 12th, 80 on the 13th & 40 on the 14th all at Mai Po.

Spot Billed Duck – Anas poecilorhyncha
Small numbers seen on eight dates with a maximum of 12 on the 7th at Mai Po.



Spot-billed Ducks at Mia Po.
Eurasian Wigeon – Anas Penelope
Four seen on the 8th and 2 on the 14th at Mai Po.

Garganey – Anas querquedula
Seen on four dates, at Mai Po with a daily maximum of 16 on the 13th.

Northern Shoveler – Anas clypeata
Recorded on four dates at Mai Po with a daily maximum of 15 on the 13th.

Mallard – Anas platyrhynchos
Recorded only on two dates at Mai Po, with 5 on the 7th and 1 on the 12th.

Falcated Duck – Anas falcate
A drake with four ducks seen from the tower hide at Mai Po on the 7th and 2 ducks present on the scrape on the 12th.

Baikal Teal – Anas fromosa
A fully winged, unringed drake joined the captive ducks at Mai Po. It had been present for several days and was seen by ourselves on the 7th but we again looked for it on the
9th but it had gone. Its orgin is uncertain.

Smew – Mergus albellus
A female had been present in the captive duck pen at Mai Po since January and was seen by ourselves on the 15th. As with the previous species, it was not a “local” captive duck but its orgin must be suspect.

Osprey – Pandion haliaetus
Two were present from the broadwalk hide in Deep Bay, Mai Po on 4 dates with 4 there on the 13th sitting on posts in the Bay.

Black Kite – Mivus migrans
Recorded on 7 dates with a maximum of 15 on the 10th. Seen at various sites including on the island of Ping Chau and also flying around the skyscrapers in Kowloon. This race is known as Black Eared Kite and considered by some to be a full species.

Crested Goshawk – Accipiter trivirgatus
Singles seen at Chau Tau on the 11th, and Tai Po Kau on the 12th.

White Bellied Sea Eagle – Haliaeetus leucogaster
A single adult put on a fine display as it attempted to fish. It was seen from the return ferry crossing from Ping Chau Island on the 9th.

Greater Spotted Eagle – Aquila clanga
An immature bird, gave excellent views as it flew over our heads at Mai Po on the 12th.

Eastern Marsh Harrier – Circus spilonotus
Two immatures were seen at Mai Po on the 11th.

Northern Hobby – Falco subbuteo
A single bird seen at Kam Tin on the 10th.

Peregrine – Faloc peregrinus
Up to 2 present on 5 dates at Mai Po.

White Breasted Waterhen – Amaurornis phoenicurus
Up to 12 recorded virtually daily at Mai Po with others seen at suitable sites.

Moorhen – Gallinula chloropus
Up to 20 seen daily.

Coot – Fulica atra
Up to 4 seen on three dates at Mai Po.

Grey Plover – Pluvialis squatarola
Recorded on 4 dates from the broad-walk hide at Mai Po with a daily maximum of 25 on
The 14th.

Pacific Golden Plover – Pluvialis fulva
Good numbers recorded from the broad-walk hide at Mai Po, with 60 on the 8th, 80 on the 11th, 20 on the 12th, 200 on the 13th, and 100 on the 14th. Odd birds were in stunning full summer plumage but the majority were in partial summer plumage.



Pacific Golden Plovers with other waders etc at Deep Bay


Flock of Pacific Golden Plovers at Deep Bay.




 




Various Pacific Golden Plovers at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Little Ringed Plover – Charadrius dubius
15 were seen on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui

Kentish Plover – Charadrius alexandrinus
Only seen from the broad-walk hide at Mai Po, with 10 on the 11th, 6 on the 13th and 6    on the 14th.

Lesser Sand Plover - Charadrius mongolus
Again, only seen from the broad-walk hide with 1 on the 8th, 20 on the 11th, 8 on the 13th, and 15 on the 14th. All birds were in full summer plumage and were stunning.

Greater Sand Plover – Charadrius leschenaultii
One of the commonest waders and majority were in full summer plumage. Approx. numbers seen as follows: 70 on the 7th, 300 on the 8th, 60 on the 10th, 400 on the 11th, 100 on the 12th, 500 on the 13th, 1,000 on the 14th. Most were seen from the broad-walk hide but we also saw them at Tsim Bei Tsui.





Greater Sand-Plovers in full summer plumage in Deep Bay.

Far Eastern Curlew – Numenius madagascariensis
Two seen from the broad-walk hide on the 11th with one on the 13th.

 

 

Far Eastern Curlew at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Eurasian Curlew – Numenius arquata
Up to 20 on a day, seen from the broad-walk hide on all our visits to this hide.

Whimbrel – Numenius phaeopus
Recorded on 4 dates from the broad-walk hide with a daily maximum of 10 on the 14th.

Black Tailed Godwit – Limosa limosa
Up to 20 recorded from the broad-walk hide on 5 dates, but on the 14th a flock of 500 flew in many in full summer plumage and landed right in front of the hide.


Black-tailed Godwits at high tide in Deep Bay.

Bar Tailed Godwit – Limosa lapponica
One seen from the broad-walk hide on the 11th, with 10 on the 13th and 40 on the 14th.

Asian Dowitcher – Limnodomus semipalmatus
After much searching for this species, a superb flock of 36 all in full breeding plumage, flew in with the flock of Black Tailed Godwits on the 14th and landed in front of the broad-walk hide, much to our relief and this proved to be one of the highlights of the trip.






Asian Dowitchers with Black-tailed Godwits etc at Deep Bay

Spotted Redshank – Tringa erythropus
Recorded on six dates, chiefly from the broad-walk hide, with daily maximums of 200 on the 8th and 500 on the 14th. Many were in full summer plumage.

Common Redshank – Tringa tetanus
Recorded on six dates with up to 1,000 roosting at high tide on the rocky pool at Mai Po on the 13th and 14th.

Common Greenshank – Tringa nebularia
Good numbers recorded daily at Mai Po with a daily maximum of 150 roosting at Tsim Bei Tsui on the 10th

Nordmann’s Greenshank – Tringa guttifer
All our sightings were from the broad-walk hide with excellent views obtained both in flight and on the ground.  One bird was virtually in full summer plumage with the others were just beginning to obtain some spotting. 2 on the 8th, 11 on the 11th, 1 on the 13th and 4 on the 14th.


Two Nordmann's Greenshanks with a Greenshank at Deep Bay.

 




Party of Nordmann's Greenshanks showing no legs projecting beyond the tail.


Nordmann's Greenshanks in Deep Bay, Mai Po Marshes,


Marsh Sandpiper – Tringa stagnatilis
Good numbers of this fine wader were seen, with the majority in full summer plumage. 30 on the 7th, 80 on the 8th, 50 on the 10th, 75 on the 11th, 40 on the 12th, and 400 on the 13th and 14th.

 

Adult summer plumage Marsh Sandpiper at Deep Bay.

Green Sandpiper – Tringa ochropus
Two seen on the 7th, with 2 on the 10th and 1 on the 12th. These birds were seen around the fish-ponds at Mai Po.

Wood Sandpiper – Tringa glareola
As with the previous species, all sightings were from the fish-ponds or dried paddies. 20 were seen on the 8th and the 10th at Kam Tin, 6 on the 11th with singles on the 14th and 15th.

Common Sandpiper – Actitis hypoleucos
Up to 10 recorded daily around the fish-ponds.

Terek Sandpiper – Xenus cinereus
All sightings were either from the broad-walk hide or roosting at the rocky pool at Mai Po. Many were in full summer plumage. Numbers as follows: 12 on the 8th, 30 on the 11th, 40 on the 12th, 80 on the 13th, and 150 on the 14th. Many feeding in front of the hide giving stunning views.







Terek Sandpipers in Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Grey Tailed Tattler – Heteroscelus brevipes
A single bird in full summer plumage in front of the broad-walk hide for 30 minutes on the 14th giving exceptional views.




Summer plumaged Grey-tailed Tattler at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Ruddy Turnstone – Arenaria interpres
Recorded on four dates at Mai Po with a daily maximum of 10 on the 14th.

Red Necked Phalarope – Phalaropus lobatus
Recorded on 7 dates with a daily maximum of 40 on the 13th. Chiefly seen at Mai Po but 4 were seen from the ferry on the 9th and 20 in the harbour near Kowloon on the 15th. Only the odd bird was in summer plumage with most still in winter dress.



Red-necked Phalaropes at Deep Bay,Mai Po.

Rufous Necked Stint – Calidris ruficollis
Good numbers seen from the broad-walk hide with the majority in full summer plumage. 50 on the 8th, 250 on the 11th, 30 on the 12th, 200 on the 13th and 1,000 on the 14th. We also had 20 on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui.

 

Rufous-necked Stint at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Temmincks Stint – Calidris subminuta
Our only sighting was of 12 at Tsim Bei Tsui on the 10th.

Long Toed Stint – Calidris subminuta
Three seen at Tsim Bei Tsui on the 10th gave excellent prolong views, one of which was in full summer plumage.

Spoon Billed Sandpiper – Eurynorhynchus pygmaeus
The bird of the trip. All our sightings were from the boad-walk hide on the out-going tide. The first was of a single bird, on the 11th, which spent 40 minutes feeding reasonably close. Two on the 13th were closer and spent 30 minutes and finally 1 on the 14th was further out and spent 10 minutes feeding. All the birds were still in winter plumage although one was showing some black squares on the wing-coverts and another was just beginning to show some orange as well. The bill was well seen on all the birds even when the birds were some way out. Amazing birds!!



Distant record shot of a winter plumage Spoonbill Sandpiper
at Deep Bay, also note the Broad-billed Sandpiper in the foreground.

Sharp Tailed Sandpiper – Calidris acuminata
Two seen on the 8th, with 3 on the 14th all from the broad-walk hide. One of the birds on the 14th was in full summer plumage and gave exceptional views for 20 minutes in front of the hide.

 




 



Adult summer-plumage Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Curlew Sandpiper – Calidris ferruginea
As expected, this was one of the commonest waders passing through and many were in full summer plumage. As with the other waders, the majority were seen from the broad-walk hide overlooking Deep Bay.  Up to 500 were usually seen from the hide but on the 14th we estimated some 5,000 birds feeding in front of the hide on the out-going tide.



Curlew Sandpipers with other waders at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Broad Billed Sandpiper – Limicola falcinellus
All were seen from the broad-walk hide and virtually all were in full summer plumage. 4 on the 8th, 6 on the 11th, 1 on the 12th, 30 on the 13th and 20 on the 14th. They generally kept nearer to the waters-edge and were therefore not so close to the hide.

Red Knot – Calidris canutus
Only 9 birds seen on four dates including 5 on the 14th.

Great Knot – Calidris tenuirostris
All sightings were from the broad-walk hide and all birds were in summer plumage. Exceptional views were had especially on the 14th. Numbers seen as follows:15 on the 7th, 11 on the 8th, 12 on the 11th, 1 on the 12th, 30 on the 13th and 35 on the 14th.


Two summer-plumage Great Knots with a summer-plumage Sharp-tailed Sandpiper.




 

Various summer-plumage Great Knots at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

 Pintail Snipe – Gallinago stenura
Two were seen very well in flight on the 8th at Lok Ma Chau. Lack of white trailing edge, barred underwings and a more direct flight. Call also heard and although Snipe like it was quietier and not so harsh.

Common Snipe – Gallinago gallinago
12 seen on the 10th at Kam Tin with 10 on the 13th at Mai Po.

Painted Snipe – Rostratula benghalensis
A pair were flushed from 10 feet range on their breeding grounds on the 10th at Kam Tin.

Black Winged Stilt – Himantopus himantopus
Our only record, was a single bird seen from the broad-walk hide briefly on the 7th.

Avocet – Recurvirostra avosetta
All sightings were from the broad-walk hide, with 15 on the 8th, 104 on the 11th, 100 on the 13th and 45 on the 14th.



Avocets at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Herring Gull – Larus argentatus
Adult birds of the race “mongolus” with very dark backs and yellow legs were seen from the broad-walk hide as follows: 2 on the 7th, 4 on the 8th, 2 on the 11th and 2 on the 13th, and a 1st summer bird considered to belong to the race “vegae” was also present on the 8th. This was a very pale bleached looking gull which appeared slightly smaller than the adults and with a large pale area on the wing and pink legs.

(Slaty Backed Gull – Larus schistisagus)
A 1st summer bird, standing with the “vagea” race Herring Gull on the 8th.  This was noticeably larger than the Herring with a very washed out looking plumage including pale primaries which I likened to a Glaucoucs Winged Gull and a large bulky all black bill.  The plumage appeared well worn and possibly also bleached by the sun. Although i/d by local birders as a juv. Slaty-backed Gull, it was probably some hybrid gull.


Assortment of Gulls at Deep Bay, Mai Po

Black Headed Gull – Larus ridibundus
A large flock totalling up to 1,000 birds were always present in Deep Bay. Virtually all the adults were still in winter plumage.

Saunders Gull – Larus saundersi
A superb adult in full summer plumage was seen on 5 dates from the broad-walk hide and gave exceptional views both in flight and on the mud.  It was joined by a 1st year bird on the 11th, 13th and 14th. Proved to be one of the highlights of the trip!!







 

Adult and 1stW. Saunder's Gulls at Deep Bay

Caspian Tern – Sterna caspia
Small numbers recorded on six dates chiefly from the broad-walk hide, with a daily maximum of 15 on the 8th.  Three were also seen on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui.



 Caspian Terns at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Gull Billed Tern – Gelochelidon nilotica
Reasonable numbers were seen from the broad-walk hide with a maximum of 70 on the 8th.




Gull-billed Terns at Deep Bay, Mai Po.

Little Tern – Sterna albifrons
Our only sighting was of a single bird seen from the broad-walk hide on the 11th.

Whiskered Tern – Chlidonias hybrida
Only seen from the broad-walk hide, with 1 on the 8th, 2 on the 12th & 13th, and 4 on the 14th.

Rufous Turtle Dove – Streptopelia orientalis
One seen on the 10th at Kim Tin. Passage birds seen flying through Mai Po as follows: 1 on the 12th, 3 on the 13th, 18 on the 14th, and 6 on the 15th.

Spotted Dove – Streptopelia chinensis
Very Common with 50 plus daily.

 

Spotted Dove in Kowleen Park.
Ring Necked Parakeet – Psittacula krameri
A single bird was seen at Kam Tin on the 10th.

Common Koel – Eudynamys scolopacea
Very common with many heard from various sites. Seen on 5 dates with a maximum of 6 on the 11th.

Greater Coucal – Centropus sinensis
Common at Mai Po with up to 6 seen daily also 1 seen in Kowloon Park.

Lesser Coucal – Centropus bengalensis
One seen on the 11th at Chau Tau.

Savannah Nightjar – Caprimulgus affinis
Two seen during the evening of the 11th at Chau Tau.

Pied Kingfisher – Ceryle rudis
Two seen on the 7th at Mai Po, and 2 on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui.

Common Kingfisher – Alcedo atthis
Up to 2 seen daily at Mai Po and 2 also seen at Tsim Bei Tsui on the 10th.

Smyrna Kingfisher – Halcyon smyrnensis
One seen on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui

Black Capped Kingfisher – Halcyon pileata
Up to 4 seen daily at Mai Po with one seen in the hand, also seen at other sites.



Black-capped Kingfisher at the bird ringing site.
Dollarbird – Eurystomus orientalis
Two seen over the forest at Tai Po Kau, on the 12th.

Great Barbet – Megalima virens
Two seen in the forest at Tai Po Kau on the 12th.

Pacific Swift – Apus pacificus
Five seen on the 7th, 2 on the 9th, 30 on the 10th, 2 on the 12th, 10 on the 13th, and 20 on the 15th.

House Swift – Apus affinis
Up to 100 seen daily.

White Vented Needletail – Hirundapus cochinchinensis
Ten of these superb needletails put on a good display over a clearing in the forest at Tai Po Kau on the 12th.

Barn Swallow – Hirundo rustica
Very common, and seen daily in good numbers.

Red Rumped Swallow – Hirundo daurica
Two seen at Mai Po on the 7th.

Olive Backed Pipit – Anthus hodgsoni
All sightings from Mai Po with 2 on the 7th, 15 on the 8th, 1 on the 11th, 13th, and 14th.

 

 

 Olive-backed Pipit at Mai Po.

Richards Pipit – Anthus novaeseelandiae
4 seen at Mai Po on the 7th, 25 at Kam Tin on the 10th, and 4 on the Airport on the 15th.

Red Throated Pipit – Anthus cervinus
Two, in full summer plumage, gave excellent views on the 10th at Kam Tin.


Summer plumage Red-throated Pipit at Kam Tin.

White Wagtail – Motacilla alba
Recorded on 5 dates with a maximum of 18 at Mai Po on the 12th.

Grey Wagtail – Motacilla cinerea
Four seen on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui with 1 on the 12th at Tai Po Kau.

Yellow Wagtail – Motacilla flava
Recorded on 4 dates with a daily maximum of 25 on the 10th at Kam Tin.

Ashy Minivet – Pericrocotus divaricatus
Two seen on the 12th at Tai Po Kau and 1 at Mai Po on the 15th.

Grey Chinned Minivet – Pericrocotus solaris
Four, seen at Tai Po Kau, on the 12th.

Scarlet Minivet – Pericroctus flammeus
Four, seen at Tai Po Kau, on the 12th.

Red Vented Bulbul – Pycnonotus aurigaster
Just 2 seen on the 8th at Lok Ma Chau.

Red Whiskered Bulbul – Pycnonotus jocosus
Common, up to 20 seen daily.

Chinese Bulbul – Pycoonotus sinensis
Very common, possibly the commonest passerine, with up to 100 seen daily.


Chinese Bulbul at Mai Po.
Chestnut Bulbul – Hypsipetes castanotus
Five seen on the 12th at Tai Po Kau forest.

Black Drongo – Dicrurus macrocercus
Just 2 seen at Mai Po on the 14th.

Ashy Drongo – Dicrurus leucophaeus
One of the white cheeked race “leucogenis”, seen at Tai Po Kau forest on the 12th.

Hair Crested Drongo – Dicrurus hottentottus
One at Mai Po on the 11th.

Magpie – Pica pica
Up to 10 seen daily.

Jungle Crow – Corvus macrorhynchus
Small numbers seen daily.

Collared Crow – Corvus torquatus
Odd birds seen almost daily at Mai Po.

Red Headed Tit – Aegithalos concinnus
A single bird seen on the 12th at Tai Po Kau forest.

Great Tit – Parus major
Small numbers recorded on 4 dates with a maximum of 6 on the 12th at Tai Po Kau.

Velvet Fronted Nuthatch – Sitta frontalis
Three seen on the 12th at Tai Po Kau forest.

Black Faced Laughing Thrush – Gerrulax perspicillatus
Up to 10 recorded on six dates at Mai Po.

Silver Eared Mesia – Leiothrix argentauris
Two seen on the red trail at Tau Po Kau forest on the 12th were of unknown orgin.

Vinous Throated Parrotbill – Paradoxornis webbiana
Two seen in Kowloon Park on the 15th.

Dusky Warbler – Phylloscipus fuscatus
Two trapped on the 7th at Mai Po with singles seen there on the 8th, 9th, 10th and 14th, with 4 on the 12th, two of which were displaying.

Arctic Warbler – Phylloscopus borealis
One gave good views in Kowloon Park on the 15th.

Yellow Browed Warbler – Phylloscopus inornatus
Many heard calling at Mai Po, Ping Chau Island and especially Tai Po Kau. Very difficult to see and the following were our sightings. 3 on the 12th, 1 on the 14th, and 2 on the 15th in Kowloon Park.

Great Reed Warbler – Acrocephalus arundinaceus
All sightings at Mai Po as follows: 1 on the 11th, 3 on the 14th, and 1 on the 15th. Others were heard calling including several singing from the mangroves.

Black Browed Reed Warbler – Acrocephalus bistrigiceps
One trapped on the 7th was our only record.





Black-browed Reed Warbler trapped at the bird ringing site.

Manchurian Bush Warbler – Cettia canturians
One trapped on the 7th was our only record. Good chestnut cap and white supercillium and was only slightly bigger than the Black Browed Reed Warbler.
This bird was initially identified by the ringers as a Chinese Bush Warbler, but since our visit the publication of Reed and Bush Warblers as part of the Helm Identification Guides and my photographs seem to indicate that the identification seems to fit Manchurian Bush Warbler and not Chinese Bush Warbler.



Manchurian Bush Warbler at the bird ringing site.

Fan Tailed Warbler – Cisticola juncidis
Our only sighting was of a single bird on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui

Plain Prinia – Prinia subflava
Up to 6 seen daily, chiefly at Mai Po.

Yellow Bellied Prinia – Prinia flaviventris
Far commoner than Plain Prinia, with good numbers seen daily with a maximum of 50 on the 7th.


Yellow-bellied Prinia at Mai Po Marshes.
Common Tailorbird – Orthotomus sutorius
One at Mai Po on the 7th, 2 on the 9th and 1 on the 15th with 1 at Tai Po Kau on the 12th and a number of others were heard calling.

Siberian Rubythroat – Luscinia calliope
A superb male was holding territory close to the pathway at Mai Po. It would often sit on top of the reeds in full song and gave excellent views. We saw it on 4 different days and on one day DRC watched it singing from just 10 feet distance. One of the highlights!!

Stonechat – Saxicola torquata
Up to 4 seen daily, three were adult males.

Oriental Magpie Robin – Copsychus saularis
Small numbers seen almost daily at various sites, with a daily maximum of 8 on the 12th at Tai Po Kau.

Eyebrowed Thrush – Turdus obscurus
A superb adult male gave prolonged views on Ping Chau Island on the 9th.

Grey Backed Thrush – Turdus hortulorum
Two males, which were very skulking, feeding on the ground underneath bushes, were seen at Mai Po on the 7th, 13th and 14th. On the last date, we finally obtained some excellent views and they proved to be fine birds.

Asian Brown Flycatcher – Muscicapa dauurica
One seen on Ping Chau Island on the 9th with singles at Mai Po on the 11th and 15th. One in Kowloon Park also on the 15th.

Narcissus Flycatcher – Ficedula narcissina
A beautiful adult male gave stunning views in Kowloon Park on the 15th and proved to be a good ending to the trip. It was one of the highlights for us!!

Japanese Paradise Flycatcher – Terpsiphone atrocaudata
A female was found at Mai Po on the 11th.  It proved to be a very educational bird, being duller than Paradise Flycatcher, the tail was darker than the back and contrasted with the rest of the wings.

Brown Shrike – Lanius cristatus
A female probably of the grey -headed “lucionensis” race was seen in Kowloon Park on the 15th.

Long Tailed Shrike – Lanius schach
Singles seen on six dates at Mai Po with 5 seen on the 8th at Lok Ma Chau including two of the melanistic variety known as “Dusky Shrike”, and were quite impressive birds.


Melanistic form of the Long-tailed Shrike (aka Dusky Shrike) at 
Lok Ma Chau
Black Collared Starling – Sturnus nigricollis
Up to 10 seen daily at various sites.


Black-collared Starling feeding in spilt grain.
Chinese Starling – Sturnus sinensis
Two seen at Mai Po on the 8th and 13th were our only sightings.

Crested Mynah – Acidotheres cristatellus
Very common. Up to 60 seen daily.

Hill Mynah – Gracula religiosa
Two were seen at the Tai Po Kau forest on the 12th.

Red Billed Leiothrix – Leiothrix lutea
A single bird seen in Kowloon Park on the 15th.

Hwamei – Garrulax canorus
A single bird seen in Kowloon Park on the 15th.

Fork Tailed Sunbird – Aethopyga christinae
A single bird seen by DRC on the 12th in Tai Po Kau forest.

Scarlet Backed Flowerpecker – Dicaeum cruentatum
Six were seen in Tai Po Kau forest on the 12th.

Japanese White Eye – Zosterops japonicus
Common, with up to 20 seen daily at various locations.


Japanese White-Eye at the Mai Po bird ringing site.
Eurasian Tree Sparrow – Passer montanus
Very common and widespread.

Baya Weaver – Pioceus philippinus
Two female types seen at Mai Po on the 15th were of suspect origin.

White Backed Munia – Lonchura striata
Our only sighting was of 8 in Kowloon Park on the 15th.

Spotted Munia – Lonchura punctulata
Two were seen at their nests in the Tai Po Kau forest on the 12th.

Black Faced Bunting – Emberiza spodocephala
Up to 10 seen daily at Mai Po.


Black-faced Bunting at Mai Po. 

Little Bunting – Emberiza pusilla
Recorded at Mai Po as follows: 1 on the 7th, 4 on the 11th, and 2 on the 15th. Also 3 on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui. Most were in full breeding plumage.

Yellow Breasted Bunting – Emberiza aureola
Two seen at Mai Po on the 8th with 1 on the 10th at Tsim Bei Tsui, but only poor views obtained.

No comments:

Post a Comment